Headlines Statistically Speaking

If they come, can we build?
by Dr. Romulo A. Virola 1
Secretary General, NSCB

The turmoil in the Middle East has put the lives of many of our countrymen and women at risk. Many of them have come back or have been repatriated back for security reasons, but many more are still there who might also need to come home if the situation continues to worsen. When this happens, it can create pressure on the labor market,  and government with the help of the private sector must be prepared for the challenge.

Worker Remittances as a percentage of GDP averaged 1.9% among developing countries and 1.5% among developing countries in East Asia and the Pacific for 2004-2009  (Table1). However, for the Philippines, our OFWs contributed much bigger shares of 13.9%, 17.6%, and 17.1% to GDP at current prices in 2008, 2009, and 2010, respectively. In constant prices, the contributions are 14.8%, 18.6%, and 18.1%, respectively.2 As we all know, our 1OFWs  make a substantial contribution to our economy, and so despite the social cost of the Pinoy diaspora, we have come to hail them as our heroes. But with the current threat to the demand for their services, they can also pose a problem to our domestic economy.

The 2009 Survey on Overseas Filipinos (SOF) 3 estimates the number of OFWs at 1.9 million, 47.2% or 901 thousand of whom are women (Table 2). For the same year, the POEA 4 estimates the number of deployed landbased workers at 1.1 million, 64% or 669 thousand of whom are in the Middle East. The largest deployment 2is to Saudi Arabia with 291 thousand, followed by United Arab Emirates (197 thousand), Qatar (89 thousand), and Kuwait (46 thousand). Bahrain has 15 thousand, Libya 10 thousand, and Yemen less than 2 thousand. Egypt got less than 500 and Tunisia, less than a hundred. In 2008, the deployment level was slightly less at 632 thousand. Since landbased workers normally have two-year contracts, the stock of landbased OFWs in the Middle East should be close to 1.3 million. (Table 3) And while Saudi Arabia has been spared so far from the troubles that plague the other countries in the 3Middle East, potentially, we could have to deal with a double whammy of the loss of billions of pesos in remittances, and a spike in unemployment due to the addition of 1.3 million OFWs to the labor force.

According to the United Nations 5 , as a result of the global financial crisis, between 2007 and 2009, at least 30 million jobs were lost worldwide and “the lack of remunerative employment growth is probably the weakest link in the recovery”. But  while employment levels were back up to pre crisis levels by the first quarter of 2010 in a number of developing countries including the Philippines, “the economic downturn in 2009 and the consequent increase in unemployment and vulnerable 4employment, compounded in some cases by retreats in social spending, have caused important setbacks in the progress towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).”

In the Philippines, per the MDG monitoring statistics compiled by the NSCB, the probability of attaining our  target on poverty reduction has  remained at MEDIUM 6 although the Pace of Progress has decreased from 0.65 in 2006 to 0.53 in 2009. (Table 4)

With a total labor force of  39.2 million Pinoys in the January 2011 round of the Labor Force Survey of the NSO 7,  an addition of 49 thousand if the OFWs deployed over two years in Bahrain, Libya, and 5Yemen all come home (Scenario 1)  would have pushed the unemployment rate only slightly from 7.4% to 7.5%. However, the worst case scenario of  1.3 million OFWs in the Middle East coming home without finding a job in the local market (Scenario 2), which of course hopefully will not happen, would have pushed the unemployment rate up to 10.4%. (Table 5)

In the case of remittances 8, Scenario 1 and Scenario 2 would cause a reduction 9  of about 26 billion pesos ( 0.3% of 6GDP) and 693 billion pesos (8% of GDP),  respectively. 

If we must continue to export the services of our human resources, it is disappointing that we do not seem to have recognized and taken advantage of the developments in neighboring China and India. In the POEA data, these two countries attracted only 8,771 and 1,010 landbased OFWs or 0.83% and 0.10%, respectively of the total deployment in 2009. In the SOF table, China is lumped with Other Countries in East Asia, while India is not even mentioned. Of our total merchandise exports, China had the fourth largest share of 11.7% in January 2011, after the USA (15.1%), Singapore (14.3%), and Japan (14.1%). In December 2010, the top shares also went to these four countries but in a different order: Japan (15.4%), China (14.3%), USA (13.6%), and Singapore (10.8%). India is lumped with Others.10

7 Of course we sympathize with the families of the three OFWs executed in China last month, but this should not detract us from pursuing development strategies that support our policies. China and India are big markets that, in a globalized environment, must be tapped by all means. The possibilities are unlimited but clearly,  we have failed to grab the opportunities so far!  Sabi nga ni Claire de la Fuente, Sayang!8

The Middle East crisis, coupled with the terrible tsunami that hit Japan where about 13 thousand landbased OFWs were deployed in 2008 and 2009 combined, from levels of 63 thousand, 74 thousand and 43 thousand in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, and exacerbated by the upward volatility in commodity prices, particularly food and oil, is indeed a challenge that we cannot be complacent about. Whether in terms of creating local jobs for our OFWs, finding other markets for their services,  or taking care of the social repercussion of their displacement, just what kind of workers should we be prepared to deal with?

9According to the 2009 Survey on Overseas Filipinos,

So when our OFWs come back from the Middle East and Japan or from other destinations, we must build the necessary social and economic infrastructure to accommodate and absorb them back in our society. This includes creating local jobs, providing the needed social services and tapping emerging markets like China and India. And in crafting our policies and developing our strategies, it is about time we learned to use the power of statistics. Unfortunately, many of our decision makers including our politicians have not appreciated statistics enough to translate them into policies and programs that may spell the difference between achieving and not achieving our MDGs by 2015. Neither have they appreciated statistics enough to muster the political will to invest in statistics. Talagang Sayang, Claire!

  We condole with the family and friends of Dr. Cristina Perlas Parel, the first Filipino with a Ph.D. in Statistics, and the only Professor Emeritus of the School of Statistics of the University of the Philippines, who passed away yesterday morning.  Dr. Parel is a pillar of the Philippine Statistical System, who as  a former Dean of the UP Statistical Center, developed the first Master’s and Ph.D. programs in Statistics in the country, and thus contributed significantly to the development of the statistical manpower not only in the Philippines but also of other countries! May she rest in peace!

And may we all appreciate the message of the Holy Week!

 

 

Reactions and views are welcome thru email to the author at ra.virola@nscb.gov.ph

 

_______________
1 Secretary General of the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB) and Chairman of the Statistical Research and Training Center (SRTC). He holds a Ph. D. in Statistics from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, U.S.A. and has taught mathematics and statistics at the University of the Philippines. He is also a past president of the Philippine Statistical Association. The author thanks Noel S. Nepomuceno, Mildred B. Addawe, Jessamyn O. Encarnacion, Bernadette B. Balamban, Michelle M. Viernes, Cynthia S. Regalado, Candido J. Astrologo, Jr., Rhea June S. Lara, Ma. Libertie V. Masculino, Albert A. Garcia, Andrea C. Baylon, and Edgard E. Enrado for the assistance in the preparation of the article. The views expressed in the article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the NSCB.

2 NSCB, National Accounts of the Philippines, CY 2008 to CY 2010.

3 Conducted by the National Statistics Office, the results were released on 4 June 2010 and updated on 1 April 2011.

4 2009 Overseas Employment Statistics, POEA.

5 United Nations, World Economic Situation and Prospects 2011

6 Probability is LOW when the Pace of Progress is less than 0.5, MEDIUM when it is from 0.5 to 0.9 and HIGH when greater than 0.9. See NSCB website, http://www.nscb.gov.ph/stats/mdg/mdg_watch.asp

7 See NSO website, http://www.census.gov.ph

8 The Philippine System of National Accounts compiled by the NSCB measures compensation which is not the same as remittances sent home by the OFWs.

9 Estimated roughly by computing the share of the Middle East-based landbased OFWs of the average compensation for 2009 and 2010

10 See NSO website, http://www.census.gov.ph

11 See NSCB, National Accounts of the Philippines, CY 2008 to CY 2010.

 

 

Table 1. Worker remittances to developing countries and economies in transition, 2004-2009

  Remittances
as a share of GDP (%)
All developing countries 1.9
Least developed countries 5.0
Low-income countries 6.8
Lower middle income countries 2.5
Upper middle income countries 1.1
East Asia and the Pacific 1.5
Europe and Central Asia 1.4
Latin America and the Caribbean 1.5
Middle East and North Africa 3.1
South Asia 4.7
Sub-Saharan Africa 2.3

Source: World Economic Situation and Prospects 2011, United Nations

 

Table 2.Distribution of Overseas Filipino Workers by Sex and Age Group: 2009

Age Group Both Sexes Male Female
Percent Cumulative Percent Percent Cumulative Percent Percent Cumulative Percent
Philippines 1,912   1,010   901  
Number of OFWs
(In thousands)
    52.8   47.1  
15 - 24 9.8 9.8 7.1 7.1 12.9 12.9
25 - 29 24.8 34.6 22.7 29.8 27.2 40.1
30 - 34 21.7 56.3 20.1 49.9 23.5 63.6
35 - 39 15.5 71.8 15.7 65.6 15.3 78.9
40 - 44 12.0 83.8 13.5 79.1 10.3 89.2
45 and over 16.2 100.0 20.9 100.0 10.9 100.1

Notes: Details may not add up to totals due to rounding. The estimates cover overseas Filipinos whose departure occurred within the last five years and who are working or had worked abroad during the past six months (April to September) of the survey period.

Source: National Statistics Office, 2009 Survey on Overseas Filipinos

 

Table 3. Deployed Landbased Overseas Filipino Workers by Destination
(New hires and Rehires): 2003-2009

Major Occupation Group 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
MIDDLE EAST 285,564 352,314 394,419 462,545 487,878 631,828 669,042
  Bahrain 6,406 8,257 9,968 11,736 9,898 13,079 15,001
  Egypt 490 385 257 302 470 559 483
  Iran 240 576 687 619 851 695 219
  Iraq 1,490 3,252 0 0 0 0 0
  Israel 5,094 5,639 5,121 5,053 5,336 3,787 4,466
  Jordan 812 1,166 3,844 5,720 3,635 1,243 1,621
  Kuwait 26,225 36,591 40,306 47,917 37,080 38,903 45,900
  Lebanon 2,786 7,795 14,970 9,596 468 12 1,326
  Libya 5,083 5,728 5,328 5,165 5,941 7,731 10,383
  Oman 3,652 4,279 5,308 7,071 7,463 10,222 10,502
  Qatar 14,344 21,360 31,421 45,795 56,277 84,342 89,290
  Saudi Arabia 169,011 188,107 194,350 223,459 238,419 275,933 291,419
  Syria 138 142 139 108 131 129 200
  United Arab Emirates 49,164 68,386 82,039 99,212 120,657 193,810 196,815
  Yemen 629 651 681 792 1,252 1,382 1,417
  Middle East (unsp.) 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
ASIA 255,287 266,609 259,209 222,940 218,983 219,598 260,995
  Afghanistan 19 148 498 887 1,097 6 4
  Bangladesh 416 286 350 413 546 534 445
  Bhutan 0 3 3 2 0 0 9
  Brunei 9,829 10,313 9,083 9,461 14,667 6,930 7,413
  Cambodia 719 605 691 571 954 1,015 1,526
  China 2,168 2,942 4,608 5,654 5,901 7,029 8,771
  East Timor 439 553 735 283 471 472 816
  Hong Kong 84,633 87,254 98,693 96,929 59,169 78,345 100,142
  India 408 316 394 332 884 989 1,010
  Indonesia 1,534 1,744 2,186 2,102 3,285 2,798 3,705
  Japan 62,539 74,480 42,633 10,615 8,867 6,555 6,418
  Kazakhstan 1,580 314 558 787 1,661 1,351 2,023
  Kirgiztan 0 2 0 2 3 51 38
  Korea 7,136 8,392 9,975 13,984 14,265 12,367 14,851
  Laos 181 54 164 153 434 647 615
  Macau 2,335 2,361 2,684 2,802 3,578 6,067 6,729
  Malaysia 7,891 6,319 6,599 5,749 9,725 6,034 7,256
  Maldives 186 142 180 365 910 774 874
  Mongolia 9 32 48 45 68 86 87
  Myanmar 221 139 152 92 94 126 186
  Nepal 5 6 6 3 9 8 5
  Pakistan 58 84 170 206 281 317 407
  Singapore 24,737 22,198 28,152 28,369 49,431 41,678 54,421
  Sri Lanka 309 293 362 231 365 276 265
  Tadzhikistan 4 3 0 3 8 8 11
  Taiwan 45,186 45,059 46,737 39,025 37,136 38,546 33,751
  Thailand 2,139 1,750 2,401 2,497 3,144 3,750 5,009
  Turkmenistan 2 29 41 26 53 49 75
  Uzbekistan 8 5 3 4 5 5 7
  Vietnam 596 783 1,103 1,348 1,972 2,785 4,126
EUROPE 37,984 55,209 52,143 59,296 45,607 51,795 47,409
  Albania 0 5 2 2 5 3 11
  Andorra 180 83 83 28 30 52 29
  Austria 152 132 94 64 79 69 66
  Azerbaijan 190 696 790 627 621 572 392
  Belgium 189 119 121 98 141 129 228
  Belorussia 0 1 1 11 0 0 0
  Bosnia and Hercegovina 0 1 0 0 0 0 1
  Bulgaria 8 27 2 2 12 8 16
  Channel Islands 0 0 0 0 0 13 0
  Croatia 0 2 1 18 10 26 30
  Cyprus 1,637 2,134 1,890 2,055 2,812 2,385 2,660
  Czech Republic 13 11 11 7 20 127 210
  Denmark 30 30 31 39 90 76 88
  Estonia 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
  Faeroe Island 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  Finland 15 20 13 23 75 155 190
  France 92 143 121 94 148 190 221
  Georgia 14 106 74 21 16 16 19
  Germany 75 69 78 52 73 95 90
  Gibraltar 0 0 13 6 10 22 18
  Greece 1,880 991 1,656 2,977 1,770 2,372 2,102
  Hungary 0 2 2 5 9 23 5
  Iceland 35 59 56 25 48 58 27
  Ireland 5,645 5,533 5,710 5,439 4,740 4,916 4,527
  Isle of Man 7 187 4 5 7 70 15
  Italy 12,175 23,329 21,267 25,413 17,855 22,623 23,159
  Kosovo, Republic of           3 3
  Latvia 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
  Lithuania           1 4
  Luxembourg 0 4 5 5 13 14 22
  Macedonia 0 0 0 0 49 14 4
  Malta 15 96 34 133 118 191 154
  Moldova 1 2 0 1 2 0 0
  Monaco 0 13 8 8 8 10 12
  Montenegro, Republic of           11 6
  Netherlands 228 355 329 217 566 792 584
  Norway 126 422 171 246 500 524 744
  Poland 6 27 17 108 19 88 219
  Portugal 38 84 67 55 83 80 92
  Romania 1 12 12 11 47 255 117
  Russia 67 317 1,274 2,571 3,129 1,911 960
  San Marino 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
  Serbia, Republic of           5 1
  Slovakia           6 5
  Slovenia, Republic of 1 2 2 3 3 7 13
  Spain 1,258 1,452 907 1,720 2,619 4,114 2,826
  Sweden 21 23 16 16 23 26 48
  Switzerland 238 307 287 205 262 216 232
  Turkey 49 66 64 60 70 82 126
  Ukraine           137 53
  United Kingdom 13,598 18,347 16,930 16,926 9,525 9,308 7,071
AMERICAS 11,049 11,692 14,886 21,976 28,019 31,916 31,146
  Antigua 16 2 4 8 17 18 14
  Argentina 18 16 13 12 11 25 51
  Armenia 1 8 4 4 6 9 9
  Aruba 230 132 134 51 69 111 88
  Bahamas 161 240 242 216 425 567 926
  Barbados 0 86 16 30 28 32 17
  Belize 9 0 0 0 0 0 0
  Bermuda 118 319 367 552 535 798 807
  Brazil 69 82 49 48 184 161 281
  Canada 4,006 4,453 3,629 6,468 12,380 17,399 17,344
  Caribbean (unsp.)  0 0 1 0 1 0 0
  Cayman Is. 613 532 637 728 1,003 1,129 1,056
  Chile 11 2 8 13 22 36 60
  Colombia 90 6 4 6 39 15 20
  Costa Rica 3 4 6 2 1 21 21
  Cuba 495 427 428 291 681 385 471
  Diego Garcia 1,042 643 505 371 947 578 902
  Dominica 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  Dominican Republic 11 7 5 17 5 2 4
  Ecuador 2 1 0 7 8 7 3
  El Salvador 2 5 6 2 13 15 1
  Grenada 4 12 1 9 6 24 28
  Guam 269 322 351 512 725 664 1,184
  Guatemala 11 4 2 6 4 1 1
  Guyana 14 8 6 46 19 18 18
  Haiti 43 23 64 64 122 54 91
  Hawaii 0 0 0 1 1 0 0
  Honduras 4 2 3 0 10 84 60
  Jamaica 14 20 21 47 56 79 57
  Mexico 50 245 168 185 127 90 137
  Midway Is. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  Netherlands Antilles 4 8 1 10 15 24 15
  Nicaragua 1 4 4 4 1 9 2
  Panama 4 2 32 1 6 22 38
  Paraguay 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
  Peru 0 3 0 3 6 332 230
  St. Nevis - Anguilla 0 0 20 28 64 66 33
  St. Kitts Nevis 0 0 2 3 3 3 11
  St. Lucia 0 0 0 0 0 14 25
  St. Vincent 1 1 4 34 27 30 26
  South America (unsp.) 5 187 190 517 674 518 457
  Surinam 0 2 4 7 5 11 19
  Trinidad and Tobago 6 18 181 182 268 281 178
  United States of America 3,666 3,831 7,752 11,443 9,401 8,050 6,248
  Uruguay 14 3 0 1 3 5 2
  Venezuela 23 11 6 15 5 64 65
  Virgin Is. 12 17 14 21 87 137 119
  West Indies (unsp.) 7 4 2 11 9 27 26
AFRICA 8,750 8,485 9,103 9,450 13,126 16,434 18,967
  Afars and Issas 1 3 0 0 4 7 13
  Algeria 1,076 763 768 608 909 1,848 3,215
  Angola 922 1,369 1,721 1,818 2,935 4,289 5,222
  Botswana 21 27 51 32 28 41 100
  Burkina Faso 0 0 0 0 0 0 8
  Burundi 0 0 1 0 2 0 3
  Cameroon 102 126 75 91 173 245 141
  Cape Verde 2 1 1 0 0 1 3
  Central African Republic 92 34 3 4 3 4 5
  Chad 1,895 835 450 234 946 674 817
  Congo 105 138 125 146 770 1,614 907
  Djibouti 2 18 20 216 309 345 298
  East Africa (unsp.) 3 10 6 6 8 9 34
  Equatorial Guinea 961 1,240 1,032 1,244 1,780 1,654 1,692
  Eritrea 14 33 20 10 27 11 71
  Ethiopia 12 14 64 40 58 71 123
  Gabon 138 212 200 217 390 274 257
  Ghana 64 39 91 93 245 351 357
  Guinea 1 6 3 26 16 139 168
  Ivory Coast 7 7 27 17 34 19 58
  Kenya 41 158 69 51 47 70 125
  Lesotho 10 28 53 30 49 22 39
  Liberia 1 5 7 10 35 92 79
  Madagascar 5 31 42 23 166 632 1,013
  Malawi 12 6 23 17 16 188 60
  Mali 11 8 29 40 69 64 112
  Mauritania 2 3 0 14 31 52 50
  Mauritius 1 13 30 2 46 14 8
  Morocco 51 84 156 102 138 184 249
  Mozambique 7 18 47 29 73 98 84
  Namibia 586 67 25 137 21 19 53
  Nigeria 1,472 2,075 1,960 2,324 1,601 12 252
  Rwanda 2 1 0 0 10 13 25
  Sao Tome & Principe 3 6 6 2 12 144 45
  Senegal 6 2 1 13 44 48 21
  Seychelles 112 155 195 197 180 288 241
  Somalia         2 0 1
  South Africa 42 109 98 43 229 655 627
  Sudan 362 430 1,156 923 1,061 1,354 1,540
  Swaziland 11 12 44 31 63 59 36
  Tanzania 42 70 120 87 155 327 306
  Togo 0 0 0 1 0 4 3
  Transkei 1 0 0 0 0 0 0
  Tunisia 3 23 35 7 85 201 83
  Upper Volta 9 2 0 0 0 0 0
  Uganda 13 22 24 43 89 74 110
  West Africa ( unsp. ) 42 84 55 23 83 59 98
  Zambia 15 21 17 116 104 96 118
  Zimbabwe 1 4 2 5 4 9 18
  Africa (unsp.) 469 173 251 378 76 60 79
TRUST TERRITORIES 5,023 7,177 7,596 6,481 6,674 5,461 5,134
Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands 3,562 5,156 5,622 4,686 3,930 3,626 3,224
  - Rota 55 79 90 60 56 37 36
  - Saipan 1,539 2,219 1,966 1,364 3,698 3,514 1,656
  - Tinian 74 56 49 57 41 25 26
  - Marianas 1,894 2,802 3,517 3,205 135 50 1,506
Federated States of Micronesia 358 439 393 356 437 484 554
  - Chuuk ( Truk ) 6 9 3 1 0 3 11
  - Pohnpei ( Ponape ) 54 30 45 29 32 39 41
  - Yap 0 6 6 8 10 35 19
  - Micronesia ( unsp. ) 298 394 339 318 395 407 483
Republic of Marshall Is. 86 94 118 99 215 203 108
  - Majuro 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  - Marshall Is. (unsp.) 86 94 118 99 215 203 108
  Republic of Belau 923 1,337 1,291 1,129 1,706 846 940
  Melanesia 77 134 143 169 307 219 254
  - Cook Is. 5 16 14 31 48 47 52
  - Fiji Is. 28 45 45 56 105 64 71
  - Solomon Is. 40 67 76 77 146 100 117
  - Vanuatu 4 6 8 5 8 8 14
  - Melanesia 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  Polynesia 17 16 29 40 70 63 54
  - Samoa 9 9 14 18 55 41 37
  - Tonga 8 7 15 22 15 22 17
Trust Territories (unsp. ) 0 1 0 2 9 20 0
               
OCEANIA 1,698 3,023 2,866 5,126 10,691 15,030 13,297
  Australia 156 250 586 2,318 4,537 7,625 7,104
  Nauru 7 2 10 7 11 15 13
  New Caledonia 8 3 2 429 2,177 2,135 1,369
  New Zealand 64 152 196 420 1,048 1,976 1,515
  Papua New Guinea 1,463 2,616 2,072 1,952 2,918 3,279 3,296
               
  UNSPECIFIED 46,279 1 135 8 7 2,265 4,992
               
Deployed Landbased Total 1/ 651,634 704,510 740,357 787,822 810,985 974,327 1,050,982

Source: Philippine Overseas Employment Administration, Report of POEA's Labor Assistance Center

Note: 1/ The computed total deployed landbased OFWs do not add up to totals published in the 2009 Compendium of OFW Statistics at the POEA website with url: http://www.poea.gov.ph/stats/2009_OFW%20Statistics.pdf

 

Table 4. Pace of Progress in MDG Indicator 1.1
(Proportion of population below national poverty threshold)

Indicator Target 1991 2003 2006 2009

Poverty Incidence among population

Using 2003 Provincial Poverty Estimation Methodology

22.7

45.3

30.0

32.9

32.6

Using 2011 Provincial Poverty Estimation Methodology

16.6

33.1

24.9

26.4

26.5

Pace of Progress

Using 2003 Provincial Poverty Estimation Methodology

   

1.35

smiley

0.88

smiley

0.75

smiley

Using 2011 Prrovincial Poverty Estimation Methodology

   

0.99

smiley

0.65

smiley

0.53

smiley

Notes: The pace of progress is computed as the ratio of the actual annual growth rate and required annual growth rate.

smileyHigh: Pace of Progress is greater than 0.9

smileyMedium: Pace of Progress between 0.5 and 0.9

smileyLow: Pace of Progress is less than 0.5

 

Table 5. Employment Status of the Philippines: 2009, 2010 and January 2011

Philippines 2009 2009
Annual
2010 2010
Annual
2011
Jan Apr July Oct Jan Apr July Oct Jan
Levels (in '000)                      
Population 15 Years old and over   58,657 59,074 59,512   59,705 59,237   60,208   60,561   60,928   61,169 60,717 61,523
Labor Force Participation 37,116 37,824 38,437   38,197 37,893   38,828   38,512   38,946   39,288 38,893 39,212
Employed persons 34,262 34,997 35,514   35,478 35,062   36,001   35,413   36,237   36,488 36,035 36,293
Unemployed persons 2,854   2,827   2,923   2,719 2,831   2,827   3,099   2,709   2,800   2,859 2,919
Underemployed persons 6,238   6,621   7,036   6,876 6,693   7,107   6,297   6,502   7,142   6,762 7,054
Percentage (in %)                      
Labor Force Participation Rate 63.3   64.0 64.6 64.0   64.0 64.5 63.6 63.9 64.2   64.1 63.7
Employment Rate 92.3   92.5 92.4 92.9   92.5 92.7 92.0 93.0 92.9   92.6 92.6
Unemployment Rate 7.7 7.5 7.6 7.1   7.5   7.3   8.0   7.0   7.1 7.4 7.4
Underemployment Rate 18.2   18.9 19.8 19.4   19.1 19.7 17.8 17.9 19.6   18.8 19.4

Source: National Statistics Office, Labor Force Survey

 

Table 6. Distribution of Overseas Filipino Workers by Sex
and Major Occupation Group: 2009

Major Occupation Group Both Sexes Male Female
Philippines      
Number of OFWs (In thousands) 1,912 1,010 901
       
Total 100.0 100.0 100.0
Officials of government and special-interest      
organizations corporate executive, managers,      
managing proprietors and supervisors 2.5 3.6 1.3
Professionals 10.1 9.7 10.5
Technicians and associate professionals 6.3 8.5 3.8
Clerks 4.9 3.2 6.8
Service workers and shop and market sales workers 14.8 11.8 18.1
Farmers, forestry workers and fishermen 0.3 0.6 0.1
Trade and related workers 14.9 26.7 1.8
Plant and machine operators and assemblers 13.9 24.9 1.5
Laborers and unskilled workers 32.3 11.1 56.1
Special occupations 0.1 0.1 -

Notes: Details may not add up to totals due to rounding.

The estimates cover overseas Filipinos whose departure occurred within the last five years and who are working or had worked abroad during the past six months (April to September) of the survey period.

Source: National Statistics Office, 2009 Survey on Overseas Filipinos

 

Table 7. Distribuition of Overseas Filipino Workers by Sex and Region: 2009

Place of Work Both Sexes Male Female
Philippines      
Number (In thousands) 1,912 1,010 901
       
Total 100.0 100.0 100.0
National Capital Region 13.9 16.3 11.2
Cordillera Administrative Region 2.1 1.4 2.9
I - Ilocos Region 8.6 6.2 11.3
II - Cagayan Valley 5.7 3.0 8.7
III - Central Luzon 14.7 17.4 11.7
IVA - CALABARZON 16.4 21.3 10.9
IVB - MIMAROPA 1.7 1.8 1.7
V - Bicol Region 3.0 3.0 2.9
VI - Western Visayas 9.2 8.3 10.2
VII - Central Visayas 6.1 7.4 4.7
VIII - Eastern Visayas 2.9 2.8 3.0
IX - Zamboanga Peninsula 2.2 1.6 2.9
X - Northern Mindanao 2.8 3.0 2.6
XI - Davao Region 2.8 2.0 3.6
XII - SOCCSKSARGEN 4.2 2.0 6.6
XIII - Caraga 1.3 1.3 1.2
Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao 2.4 1.1 3.8

Note: Details may not add up to totals due to rounding.

The estimates cover overseas Filipinos whose departure occurred within the last five years and who are working or had worked abroad during the past six months (April to September) of the survey period.

Source: National Statistics Office, 2009 Survey on Overseas Filipinos

 

 

Posted 11 April 2011.

 

Statistically Speaking
Press Releases
Announcements
Beyond the Numbers
Sexy Statistics
StatFocus
 
For the Record
Media Services
Events
 
E-Newsletter
 
jobs@nscb.gov.ph
Bids, Quotations & Canvasses
Share |
             
  Email the Webmaster E-mail the webmaster Terms of Use Home • Top of Page  
 

PHILIPPINE STATISTICS AUTHORITY
PSA CVEA Bldg., East Avenue Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines
Telephone no. 462-6600 loc. 839; E-mail: info@psa.gov.ph