Beyond the Numbers

 

... the significant increase in inflation rate for the bottom 30% income households in 2008 was attributed to the food component of the CPI which surged to 17.0 percent during the year.

 

This illustrates that in the midst of economic crisis, the low income earners, who have relatively higher expenditure share allotted on food, are adversely affected.

Beyond the Numbers
Is the Price Right?

by Jose Ramon G. Albert, Ph.D.1                                              Filipino Version


Is the Price Right?The volume of food a family consumes depends on the amount of food they purchase given the resources available to the family. The level of food consumption of a family is undoubtedly influenced by prevailing commodity prices in the market. Using first semester income data from the 2012 Family Income and Expenditure Survey conducted by the National Statistics Office, the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB) estimates that in the first semester of 2012, about one out of ten Filipino families was “food poor.” That is, 10 percent of families in the first six months of 2012 had incomes not sufficient to meet the minimum basic food needs. This figure is unchanged from the corresponding figures in the first  semesters of 2006 and 2009 (Table 1). In the first six months of 2012, Filipinos  needed at least an income of Php 5,458 for a family of five per month  for them not to be considered as food poor.

Relatedly, as prices of basic goods and services increase, these “food poor” families will continue to face difficulties especially in meeting their basic food needs. Many people are under the impression that it is the responsibility of government to maintain inflation. Actually, this task to promote a low and stable inflation is the objective of monetary authorities of the country, chiefly the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP).   The BSP has been adopting an inflation targeting framework for monetary policy to stabilize prices deemed conducive for a balanced and sustainable economic growth.

The changes in the price level of goods and services that most people buy for their day-to-day consumption is measured by the Consumer Price Index (CPI). This indicator is used by the country to measure the rate of inflation, which is equivalent to a decline in the purchasing power of peso. Since families that belong to the lower portion of the income distribution are more susceptible to economic and social downturns (than those in the higher brackets), monitoring the welfare of these families is one of the main thrusts of government.

The National Statistics Office (NSO) reports a separate CPI for the bottom 30% income households based on a concept of “relative poverty.” One of the common patterns in this income group is that the amount of money spent on food items is substantially higher compared to their expenditure on other items (Table 2). This is consistent with Engel's law, which states that as income rises, the proportion of income spent on food falls, even if actual expenditure on food rises. Thus, price changes in food items significantly affect families in the low income group than any other group (e.g. middle or upper income). The CPI for the bottom 30% income households, therefore, can provide a more appropriate deflator of income and inflator of food prices and other basic commodities, which can be used by the government in making plans and programs to uplift the standard of living of low-income families.

Over the past decade, the average rate of inflation for the bottom 30% income households was recorded at 5.7 percent,  This inflation rate is higher than the inflation rate for all income groups (4.6 percent). Note that in 2008, when the global financial crisis commenced, the recorded inflation rate for the bottom 30% was 13.9 percent. Expectedly, the significant increase in inflation rate for the bottom 30% income households in 2008 was attributed to the food component of the CPI which surged to 17.0 percent during the year (Tables 3 and 4).  This illustrates that in the midst of economic crisis, the low income earners, who have relatively higher expenditure share allotted on food, are adversely affected. Consequently, it is important for government to ensure that social safety nets are present (but we must also remember that safety nets are meant to be transitory in nature).  

What are the foods commonly consumed by Filipinos who belong to the bottom 30%?

In 2012, the NSCB published Sexy Statistics articles entitled “Where can you buy the cheapest Bangus, Galunggong and Tilapia?2” and “Sulu sells the cheapest rice3“ to provide the public information on relative price levels of basic food that Filipinos typically serve in their tables.

The retail price of regular milled rice, the staple food of the Pinoys, has practically doubled over a dozen years, from Php 18.0 per kilo in 2000 to Php 32.1 per kilo in 2012.  In 2012, rice is most expensive in Iloilo followed by Mountain Province and Siquijor. Surprisingly, the Rice Granary of the Philippines, Nueva Ecija, is not offering the most affordable rice; instead, Quezon, Tarlac and Nueva Vizcaya have the cheapest rice (Tables 5, 6 and 7).

Fish commonly served by Filipinos, viz., bangus, galunggong and tilapia, have dramatically increased their prices.  Before, galunggong or “GG”  used to be “poor man’s fish”, but there are clear signs that this is not true anymore. GG retail price increased from Php 59.8 per kilo in 2003 to Php 107.7 per kilo in 2012 or by 80.0 percent. The most expensive GG can be found in Mountain Province, Rizal and Cavite.  However, you can still find the cheapest GG in Davao del Sur, Occidental Mindoro and Marinduque (Tables 5, 20 and 21).

The prices of Tilapia and bangus also increased by 63.8 percent and 53.5 percent, respectively (Table 5).

Over the years, beef and pork meat with bones relatively increased their retail price.  The beef meat with bones retail price increased by 64.3 percent in 2012 compared to 2003.  Likewise, the price of pork meat with bones increased by 64.8 percent in 2012 (Table 5).  Among provinces, the most expensive are in Bataan while the cheapest beef and pork meat with bones can be purchased in Sulu. (Tables 10-13).

To those who go on banana diets, you may want to note that the most expensive bananas are in Bulacan, Nueva Ecija and Benguet  while the most affordable banana latundan can be found in North Cotabato, Davao Oriental, and Sultan Kudarat. (Tables 8 and 9).

Similar to the findings of the abovementioned articles, subsistence incidence has a significant positive correlation with the retail price of regular milled rice for the first semester of 2012 (Table 23).  As proclaimed by President PNoy, 2013 is the National Year of Rice. This campaign advocates for responsible rice consumption to achieve rice-self-sufficiency starting 2013. As part of this advocacy, we are even encouraged to recite the Panatang Makapalay :

 “Bilang isang mamamayang Pilipino nakikiisa ako sa panatang huwag magsayang ng kanin atbigas. Magsasaing ako ng sapatlamang at sisiguraduhing tama ang pagkakaluto nito. Kukuha ako ng kaya kong ubusin upang sa aking pinggan ay walang matirang kanin. Ganun din ang aking gagawin kung may handaan o kung sa labas ako kakain. Ang brown rice o pinawa ay susubukan kong kainin pati na ang ibang pagkain bukod sa kanin tulad ng saba, kamote, atmais. Ituturo ko sa iba ang responsableng pagkonsumo nang mabigyang halaga ang pagod ng mga magsasaka at nang makatulong na maging sapat ang bigas sa Pilipinas. Aking isasapuso ang panatang ito dahil sa bawa'tbutil ng bigas o kanin na aking matitipid ay may buhay na masasagip.”

However, we don’t want only to be rice-sufficient but we must make rice affordable especially to the poor.  In the past, government sought to do that by having the National Food Authority (NFA) rice sold at prices lower than the regular retail price of other kinds of rice. Unfortunately, data from the FIES suggests that there is leakage in access to NFA rice among non-poor households (because of lack of targeting mechanisms for the poor).    Currently, the government has embarked on having a registry of poor households (through the Department of Social Welfare and Development’s National Household Targeting System) as well as a registry of farmers (through the Department of Budget and Management’s Registry System of Basic Sectors in Agriculture).  Such targeting systems can help minimize leakages in interventions.  

Are the efforts of the government towards achieving low and stable inflation enough to combat volatilities in the global economy?

Based on our Quarterly Economic Index (QEI) report, the compensation per employee index, which includes salaries and wages received by employees in cash and in kind, increased by 8.0 percent in the fourth quarter of 2012 from 4.7 percent in the same quarter of the previous year.  It is no wonder why recent statistics collected by the private sector suggests more optimism among Filipinos.

The monetary authorities have sought to put in place various monetary measures to stabilize prices. Price stability is essential in reducing poverty and in sustaining economic growth.  The prices of basic commodities directly impact the capability of people, especially poor families, to purchase basic food commodities. Along with the initiative of the BSP towards stabilizing inflation rate, the minimum wages are regularly reviewed by the Regional Wage Boards of the Department of Labor and Employment as an additional social protection mechanism.  These interventions seek to assist those at the lower income distribution.  In addition, government is now taking on the challenge of having more interventions to ensure inclusive growth and development.  But at the end of the day, government should never be alone in its development work. The private sector has to do its share of development work. While the private sector is driven by the goal of making profits, it must also remember that it lives in a larger community, and this goal of making profits must be balanced with a sense of corporate social responsibility.

Reactions and views are welcome thru email to the author at jrg.albert@nscb.gov.ph.

 

 

Filipino Version

 

Tama ba ang Presyo?

by Jose Ramon G. Albert, Ph.D.1

Nakadepende ang dami ng pagkaing nakokonsumo ng isang pamilya sa dami ng pagkain na kanilang nabibili ayon sa kaya ng bulsa. Dahil dito, hindi kataka-taka na ang antas ng pagkonsumo ng pagkain ng isang pamilya ay  naiimpluwensyahan ng mga presyo ng produkto na umiiral sa merkado. Gamit ang datos mula sa  Family Income and Expenditure Survey na isinagawa ng National Statistics Office (NSO) tungkol sa mga kinikita ng pamilya sa unang anim na buwan ng taong 2012inulat ng National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB) na sa unang semester ng 2012, isa sa sampung pamilyang Pilipino ay salat sa pagkain 'food poor.' Sa madaling salita, sampong porsiyento ng mga pamilya sa unang anim na buwan ng 2012 ay kumikita ng hindi sapat upang matugunan ang minimum na gastos para sa mga pangunahing pangangailangan sa pagkain. Hindi nagbago ang numerong ito mula sa naturang istadistika sa unang anim na buwan ng 2006 at sa unang anim na buwan ng 2009 (Talaan 1). Sa unang semester ng 2012,  kinakailangan ng Pilipino ng kitang hindi bababa sa Php 5,458 para sa isang pamilya limang miyembro kada buwan upang hindi masabing ‘food poor’.

 

Kaugnay nito, habang tumataas ang presyo ng mga bilihin, ang mga pamilyang salat sa pagkain o ‘‘food poor’ ay lalong mahihirapan na harapin ang problema dala ng kakulangan sa pera pambili ng mga pangunahing pangangailangan sa pagkain. Karamihan sa mga tao ay may impresyon na responsibilidad  ng pamahalaan angpanatilihin ang antas ng pagtaas ng presyo ng mga bilihin (inflation). Sa katunayan, ang gawaing ito na panatilitihin ang mababang galaw ng presyo ng mga bilihin ay ang pangunahing layunin ng monetary authority ng ating bansa, ang Bangko Sentral Ng Pilipinas (BSP). Ang BSP ay gumagamit nginflation targeting framework para sa paggawa ng monetary policy upang mapanatiling mababa ang presyo ng mga bilihin para sa ikauunlad ng ekonomiya.

Ang mga pagbabago sa antas ng presyo ng mga produkto at serbisyo na karaniwang binibili ng mga tao para sa kanilang pang-araw-araw na pagkonsumo ay nasusukat ng Consumer Price Index (CPI). Ginagamit ang CPI upang sukatin ang antas ng pagtaas ng mga presyo, na katumbas naman sa pagbaba ng purchasing power ng piso. Dahil mas nararamdaman ng mga pamilyang nabibilang sa pangkat ng maymababang kita ang mga krisis na pang-ekonomiya (kaysa sa mga nasa mas mataas na kita), ang pagsubaybay sa kapakanan ng mga pamilyang ito ang isa sa mga pangunahing hangarin ng pamahalaan.

Nag-uulat din ang NSO ng CPI para sa bottom 30% income household batay sa konsepto ng "relative poverty." Isa sa karaniwang  katangian ng pamilyang nabibilang sa pangkat na ito ay  ang paggugol ng malaking halaga ng kanilang pera sa pagkain kumpara sa iba pang bagay (Talaan 2). Ito ay naaayon sa  Engel’s law, na habang tumataas ang kita, ang bahagi ng kita na nilalaan sa pagkain ay bumababa, kahit na tumataas ang aktwal na gastos sa  pagkain. Kaya, ang pagbabago ng presyo sa mga pruduktong pagkain ay lubhang nakakaapekto sa mga pamilya na nasa pangkat ng may mababang kinikita kaysa sa  ibang grupo (halimbawa, nasa gitna o mataas na kita).  Ang CPI para sa bottom 30% income household, samakatuwid, ay maaaring magbigay ng naaangkop na deflator ng income at inflator ng presyo ng mga pagkain at iba pang pangunahing produkto, na pwedeng gamitin ng pamahalaan sa paggawa ng mga plano at programa upang mapaunlad ang antas ng pamumuhay ng mga pamilyang nabibilang sa pangkat na ito.

Sa nakalipas na dekada, ang average rate of inflation para sa bottom 30% ay naitala na nasa 5.7 bahagdan. Ang inflation rate na ito ay mas mataas kaysa sa inflation rate para sa lahat ng mga income group (4.6 bahagdan). Tandaan na noong 2008, kung saan nagsimula ang isang pandaigdigang krisis pampinansyal, ang naitalang inflation rate para sa bottom 30% ay 13.9 bahagdan. Inaasahan na ang malaking pagtaas sa inflation rate para sa bottom 30% para sa taong 2008 ay iniuugnay sa food component ng CPI na umakyat sa 17.0 bahagdan sa taong ito. Nilalarawan nito na sa gitna ng pang-ekonomiyang krisis, ang low income earners, na karaniwang may mataas na bahagi ng kita na nilalaan sa pagkain ang lubos na naaapektuhan. Dahil dito, mahalaga na matiyak ng gobyerno na mayroong mga social safety nets (ngunit kailangan ding tandaan na ang safety nets ay pansamantalang lunas lamang).

Ano ang mga pagkaing karaniwang kinakain ng mga Pilipino na nabibilang sa bottom 30%? Noong 2012, nilathala ng NSCB ang mga sumusunod na Sexy Statistics articles: "Where can you buy the cheapest Bangus, Galunggong and Tilapia?" at "Sulu sells cheapest rice" upang magbigay ng pampublikong impormasyon para sa antas ng presyo ng mga pangunahing pagkain na karaniwang inihahain sa hapag kainan ng mga Pilipino.

Ang tingiang presyo ‘retail price’ ng bigas na syang pangunahing pagkain ng mga Pinoy, ay dumoble mula sa PHP 18.0 per kilo noong 2003 hanggang sa PHP 32.1 per kilo noong 2012. Noong 2012, ang Iloilo ang may pinakamahal na presyo ng bigas,sinundan ito ng Mountain Province at Siquijor. Nakakapagtaka,  na ang Rice Granary ng Pilipinas, ang Nueva Ecija, ay hindi nagbebenta ng pinakamurang presyo ng bigas; sa halip, Quezon, Tarlac at Nueva Vizcaya (Talaan 5, 6 and 7).

Kapansin pansin din na malaki ang itinaas ng presyo ng mga isdang karaniwang inihahanda ng mga Pilipino, tulad ng bangus, galunggong at tilapia. Ang galunggong o "GG" na dating tinatawag na "poor man’s fish", ay nagkakaroon na ngayon ng malinaw na senyales na magsasalungat taguring ito. Tumaas ang tingiang presyo ng GG mula sa Php 59.8 per kilo noong 2003 sa PHP 107.7 per kilonoong 2012. Ang mga pinakamahal na GG ay mabibili sa Mountain Province, Rizal at Cavite. Gayunpaman, maaari ka pa ring makakuha ng pinakamurang GG sa Davao del Sur, Occidental Mindoro at Marinduque (Talaan 5, 20 at 21).

Tumaas din ang presyo ng tilapia at bangus ng 63.8 bahagdan at 53.5 bahagdan, ayon sa pagkakabanggit (Talaan 5).

Sa paglipas ng mga taon, tumaas din ang tingiang presyo ng karneng baka at karneng baboy na may buto. Ang tingiang presyo ng karneng baka na may buto ay tumaas ng 64.3 bahagdan noong 2012 kumpara noong 2003. Gayundin, ang presyo ng karneng baboy na may buto  na tumaas ng 64.8 bahagdan noong 2012 (Talaan 5). Kabilang ang Bataan sa mga probinsyang may  pinaka-mahal na karneng baboy na may buto habang ang pinkamurang karneng baka at karneng baboy na may buto naman ay mabibili sa Sulu. (Talaan 10-13).

Para sa mga taong may “Banana diet” tandaaan ninyo na ang pinakamahal na saging ay nasa Bulacan, Nueva Ecija at Benguet habang ang saging (latundan) na may pinaka-abot-kayang halaga ay matatagpuan sa Hilagang Cotabato, Davao Oriental, at Sultan Kudarat (Talaan 8 at 9).

Tulad ng mga napag-alaman sa mga nakasaad na mga artikulo, may ugnayan ang bahagdan ng populasyon na ‘food poor’ sa presyo ng bigas para sa unang semester ng 2012 (Talaan 23).Gaya ng pahayag ni Presidente PNoy, ang taong 2013 ay binansagan na National Year of Rice. Sinusulong ng kampanyang ito ang responsableng pagkonsumo ng bigas upang makamit ang rice-self-sufficiency simula sa taong 2013. Bilang bahagi ng pagtataguyod ng kampanyang ito, tayo ay hinihikayat na bigkasin ang Panatang Makapalay:

“Bilang isang mamamayang Pilipino nakikiisa ako sa panatang huwag magsayang ng kanin atbigas. Magsasaing ako ng sapatlamang at sisiguraduhing tama ang pagkakaluto nito. Kukuha ako ng kaya kong ubusin upang sa aking pinggan ay walang matirang kanin. Ganun din ang aking gagawin kung may handaan o kung sa labas ako kakain. Ang brown rice o pinawa ay susubukan kong kainin pati na ang ibang pagkain bukod sa kanin tulad ng saba, kamote, atmais. Ituturo ko sa iba ang responsableng pagkonsumo nang mabigyang halaga ang pagod ng mga magsasaka at nang makatulong na maging sapat ang bigas sa Pilipinas. Aking isasapuso ang panatang ito dahil sa bawa'tbutil ng bigas o kanin na aking matitipid ay may buhay na masasagip.”

Gayunpaman, hindi natin nais lamang na maging rice-sufficient kundi kailangang magkaroon ng abot-kayang bigas lalo na sa mahihirap. Sa  nakaraan,  hinangad ng pamahalaan na gawin ito sa pamamagitan ng pagkakaroon ng National Food Authority (NFA) na nagbebenta ng bigas sa presyong mas mababa kaysa sa mga regular na tinginang  presyo ng iba pang mga uri ng bigas. Sa kasamaang palad, ang datos mula sa FIES, ay nagpapakita na may pamilyang di naman mahirap na bumibili rin ng NFA rice (dahil sa kawalan ng mga paraan sa pag-target ng mga programa para sa mahihirap). Sa kasalukuyan, nagsimula na ang pamahalaan  ng pagkakaroon ng talaan ng poor households (sa pamamagitan ng Department of Social Welfareand Development’s National Household Targeting System) pati na rin ang talaan ng mga magsasaka (sa pamamagitan ng Department of Budget and Management’s Registry System of Basic Sectors in Agriculture) . Ang ganitong pagtudla sa mga sistema ay maaaring makatulong na mabawasan ang leakages sa mga isinusulong na programa ng pamahalaan. (Talaan 24 at 25).

Ang mga pagsisikap ba ng pamahalaan patungo sa pagkamit ng mababa at matatag na inflation ay sapat upang malabanan ang volatilities sa pandaigdigang ekonomiya? Batay sa ulat ng Quarterly Economic Indices (QEI) , ang compensation per employee index,  kasama ang kita at sahod na natanggap ng mga empleyado sa pera at sa uri, nadagdagan ito ng 8.0 bahagdan sa ikaapat na quarter ng ​​2012 mula sa 4.7 ng nakaraang taon. Hindi nakapagtataka kung bakit kamakailan lamang, ang mga estadistika na nakolekta ng mga pribadong sektor ay nagpapakita ng pag-asa ng ating mamamayan sa hinaharap. (Talaan 26).

Hinahangad ng BSP na laging maging matuwid at maayos ang mga presyo. Mahalaga kasi ang katatagan ng presyo sa pagbabawas ng kahirapan at sa pagpapanatili ng pag-unlad ng ekonomiya. Ang presyo ng mga pangunahing pangangailan ay direktang nakakaapekto sa kakayahan ng mga tao, lalo na nang mahihirap na pamilya, upang makabili ng pangunahing kailangan na pagkain. Kaakibat ng mga hinahakbang ng BSP patungo sa pagpapatatag ng inflation rate, ang pinakamababang sahod ay regular na sinusuri ng mga Regional Wage Boards ng Department of Labor and Employment bilang karagdagang mekanismo sa panlipunang proteksyon. Hinahangad ng pamahalaan ang makatulong sa mga nasa mababang kita. Bilang karagdagan, ginagawa ng pamahalaan mga planong makakatugon sa mga hamon ng pagkakaroon ng inclusive  growth na makakaseguro na walang maiiwan sa pag-unlad, ngunit hindi lamang ito responsibilidad ng pamahalaan. Ang pribadong sektor ay dapat ding makibahagi sa mga gawaing pangkaunlaran. Habang ang pribadong sektor ay nagnanasang kumita, dapat ring tandaan nito na  nakatira ito sa isang mas malaking komunidad, at karapat dapat lang na pag-ibayuhin ng pribadong sektor ang corporate social responsibility.

Kung kayo ay may reaksyon o ibang pananaw ukol sa artikulong ito, mangyari lamang na sumulat sa may akda sa email address na: jrg.albert@nscb.gov.ph.

________________________________

1Secretary General of the National Statistical Coordination Board (NSCB). The NSCB, a statistical agency functionally attached to the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA), is the highest policy making and coordinating body on statistical matters in the Philippines. Immediately prior to his appointment at NSCB, Dr. Albert was a Senior Research Fellow at the Philippine Institute for Development Studies, a policy think tank attached to NEDA. Dr. Albert finished summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Science degree in Applied Mathematics from the De La Salle University in 1988. He completed a Master of Science in Statistics from the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1989 and a Ph.D. in Statistics from the same university in 1993. He is also a past President of the Philippine Statistical Association, a Fellow of the Social Weather Stations, and an Elected Regular Member of the National Research Council of the Philippines.

This article was co-written by Priscille C. Villanueva and Mai Lin C. Villaruel, Statistical Coordination Officer III, respectively of the NSCB. This article was translated in Filipino by Virginia M. Bathan of NSCB. The authors thank Director Candido J. Astrologo, Jr., Maria Fe M. Talento, Mechelle M. Viernes, Gerald Junne L. Clariño, Irene T. Talam, Simonette Nisperos and Noel S. Nepomuceno of the NSCB, respectively, for the assistance in the preparation of the article. The views expressed in the article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the NSCB and its Technical Staff.

We would like to thank the National Statistics Office, particularly Ms. Rosie B. Sta Ana, Chief of Economic Indices and Indicators Division, for providing us comments on the article, which we received through email on 23 July 2013.

2 http://www.nscb.gov.ph/sexystats/2012/SS20120328_fish.asp

3 http://www.nscb.gov.ph/sexystats/2012/SS20120530_Rice.asp

 

Table 1. First Semester Thresholds and Incidences: 
2006, 2009 and 2012

Statistics 1st Semester Estimate Inc/Dec Coefficient of Variation
2006 2009 2012 1st Sem  1st Sem  1st Sem  1st Sem  1st Sem 
2009/ 2006 2012/ 2009 2006 2009 2012
Monthly Food Threshold for a Family of Five (PhP) 3,894 4,903 5,458 25.9 11.3      
Subsistence Incidence (%)                
   Families 10.8 10 10 -0.8 0 2.8 3.6 4.4
   Population 14.2 13.3 13.4 -0.9 -0.1 2.7 3.5 4.2
                 
Monthly Poverty Threshold for a Family of Five (PhP) 5,586 7,040 7,821 26 11.1      
Poverty Incidence (%)                
   Families 23.4 22.9 22.3 -0.5 -0.6 1.9 2.6 3.2
   Population 28.8 28.6 27.9 -0.2 -0.7 1.8 2.5 3

Source: National Statistical Coordination Board

 

Table 2. Weights1/ for All Income and Bottom 30% Income Households by Major Commodity Group and by Area

Major Commodity Group Area
Philippines National Capital Region Areas Outside NCR
(NCR) (AONCR)
All Income Bottom 30% All Income Bottom 30% All Income Bottom 30%
All Items 100 100 100 100 100 100
FBT 50 74.5 40.2 74.9 54.2 74.5
Clothing 3 2.7 2.6 1.6 3.2 2.7
H&R 16.8 3 24.6 1.3 13.4 3.1
FLW 6.9 7 7 8.5 6.9 7
Services 15.9 7.1 19.3 7.4 14.4 7.1
Miscellaneous 7.3 5.7 6.2 6.3 7.8 5.7

1/ Used for the 2000-based CPI which are derived from the expenditure data based on the results of the 2000 FIES
Source: National Statistics Office
http://www.census.gov.ph/content/consumer-price-index-bottom-30-income-households-philippines-january-2010-december-2010

 

Table 3. Inflation Rate for Bottom 30% for all Income Household in PHILIPPINES : 2000 - 2012
(2000=100)

  2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 Average
All Items 2.4 5.9 7.9 6.6 3.2 13.9 5.1 3.6 5.1 2.9 5.7
Food 1.9 6.0 7.6 6.2 3.5 17.0 6.4 3.6 5.0 2.4 6.0
Beverage 2.1 4.5 6.6 6.1 3.5 5.9 3.7 2.1 3.3 3.8 4.2
Tobacco 1.6 1.6 6.3 4.1 2.1 4.1 3.4 2.8 6.9 5.4 3.8

Source of basic data: National Statistics Office

 

Table 4. Inflation Rate for All items for all Income Households
in PHILIPPINES : 2000 - 2012
(2006=100)

2002-2003 2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007 2007-2008 2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 Average
Philippines 2.29 4.83 6.52 5.49 2.90 8.26 4.13 3.88 4.65 3.17 4.6

Source of basic data: National Statistics Office

 

Table 5. Retail prices of selected commodities (Php per kilo): Philippines

Commodity 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2003-2012
Regular Milled Rice 18.0 18.7 20.7 21.3 22.4 29.4 30.7 30.8 31.3 32.1 78.7
Bangus [Milkfish] 75.2 85.1 87.4 89.6 96.5 104.9 114.4 112.6 112.9 125.0 66.1
Galunggong [Roundscad] 59.8 66.2 67.0 73.4 75.0 84.0 88.0 87.5 100.5 107.7 80.0
Tilapia 58.8 67.4 69.3 70.5 74.1 80.4 86.5 87.6 90.8 96.0 63.2
Beef Meat with bones 108.3 126.1 137.1 139.8 144.3 155.9 166.4 173.5 176.6 177.8 64.3
Pork Meat with bones 96.1 116.9 124.1 123.4 125.0 141.7 149.3 158.7 158.8 158.4 64.8
Chicken Fully Dressed (broiler) 88.5 101.9 103.8 106.8 112.6 121.6 128.2 129.5 128.0 128.7 45.4
Chicken egg (other breed)* 3.3 3.6 3.6 3.9 4.4 4.5 4.7 4.8 4.8 4.9 49.1
Banana Latundan, ripe* 1.4 1.5 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.2 60.0

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics
*- peso/piece

 

Table 6. Ten Provinces
with the Cheapest Regular Milled Rice

Region/Province 2012
P/kg Rank2/
Quezon 28.98 78
Tarlac 28.98 77
Nueva Vizcaya 29.00 76
Camarines Norte 29.44 75
Occidental Mindoro 29.54 74
Sorsogon 29.58 73
Camarines Sur 29.69 72
Tawi-tawi 30.00 71
Laguna 30.00 70
Batangas 30.00 69

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 7. Ten Provinces
with the Most Expensive Regular Milled Rice

Region/Province 2012
P/kg Rank2/
Iloilo 36.29 1
Mountain Province 35.74 2
Siquijor 35.39 3
Camiguin 35.08 4
Zamboanga del Norte 35.05 5
Lanao del Sur 35.00 6
Zamboanga Sibugay 34.81 7
Surigao del Norte 34.57 8
Zamboanga del Sur 34.54 9
Basilan 34.39 10

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 8. Ten Provinces
with the Cheapest Banana Latundan

Region/Province 2012
P/piece Rank2/
North Cotabato 0.70 76
Davao Oriental 0.76 75
Sultan Kudarat 0.95 74
Compostela Valley 1.06 73
Misamis Occidental 1.08 72
Camiguin 1.10 71
Maguindanao 1.14 70
Kalinga 1.16 69
Davao del Sur 1.19 68
Bukidnon 1.20 67

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 9. Ten Provinces
with the Most Expensive Banana Latundan

Region/Province 2012
P/piece Rank2/
Bulacan 4.31 1
Nueva Ecija 3.92 2
Benguet 3.89 3
Laguna 3.55 4
La Union 3.27 5
Tarlac 3.21 6
Batangas 3.11 7
Albay 2.94 8
Bohol 2.94 9
Camarines Norte 2.91 10

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 10. Ten Provinces
with the Cheapest Beef Meat with Bones

Region/Province 2012
P/kg Rank2/
Sulu 107.97 74
Negros Oriental 125.98 73
Aklan 126.00 72
Siquijor 130.00 71
Misamis Oriental 137.55 70
North Cotabato 140.00 69
Ilocos Norte 140.19 68
Maguindanao 143.00 67
Ilocos Sur 144.52 66
Romblon 145.05 65

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 11. Ten Provinces
with the Most Expensive Beef Meat with Bones

Region/Province 2012
P/kg Rank2/
Bataan 240.41 1
Nueva Ecija 235.69 2
Rizal 234.08 3
Cavite 232.41 4
Davao Oriental 220.00 5
Bulacan 214.22 6
Oriental Mindoro 213.22 7
Batangas 208.73 8
Surigao del Norte 208.38 9
Abra 207.59 10

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 12. Ten Provinces
with the Cheapest Pork Meat with Bones

Region/Province 2012
P/kg Rank2/
Sulu 94.11 76
Aklan 100.11 75
Romblon 110.73 74
Sorsogon 119.31 73
Ilocos Sur 123.71 72
Samar (Western Samar) 130.00 71
Siquijor 130.00 70
North Cotabato 130.13 69
Camarines Sur 136.20 68
Bukidnon 136.39 67

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 13. Ten Provinces
with the Most Expensive Pork Meat with Bones

Region/Province 2012
P/kg Rank2/
Bataan 184.38 1
Benguet 183.99 2
Basilan 180.00 3
Zamboanga del Norte 177.49 4
Marinduque 176.84 5
Abra 176.68 6
Negros Oriental 176.30 7
Palawan 173.97 8
Cebu 173.93 9
Southern Leyte 173.46 10

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 14. Ten Provinces
with the Cheapest Chicken (fully dressed)

Region/Province 2012
P/kg Rank2/
Bulacan 110.10 77
Misamis Oriental 113.57 76
Bohol 114.97 75
Davao del Norte 116.40 74
Negros Oriental 117.12 73
Cebu 117.20 72
Aklan 117.31 71
Biliran 117.78 70
Agusan del Norte 118.29 69
Iloilo 118.43 68

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 15. Ten Provinces
with the Most Expensive Chicken (fully dressed)

Region/Province 2012
P/kg Rank2/
Benguet 155.93 1
Occidental Mindoro 151.76 2
Ilocos Sur 151.00 3
Romblon 150.00 4
Marinduque 149.95 5
Masbate 149.83 6
Apayao 149.13 7
Aurora 147.68 8
Palawan 144.25 9
Kalinga 141.87 10

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 16. Ten Provinces
with the Cheapest Chicken eggs

Region/Province 2012
P/piece Rank2/
Cavite 4.10 77
Bataan 4.16 76
Bulacan 4.30 75
Quezon 4.32 74
Rizal 4.37 73
Catanduanes 4.39 72
South Cotabato 4.40 71
Laguna 4.40 70
Nueva Vizcaya 4.40 69
Batangas 4.43 68

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 17. Ten Provinces
with the Most Expensive Chicken eggs

Region/Province 2012
P/piece Rank2/
Eastern Samar 6.09 1
Tawi-tawi 5.84 2
Basilan 5.83 3
Davao Oriental 5.78 4
Sulu 5.74 5
Negros Oriental 5.59 6
Biliran 5.59 7
Bohol 5.57 8
Zamboanga Sibugay 5.55 9
Siquijor 5.48 10

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 18. Ten Provinces
with the Cheapest Bangus

Region/Province 2012
P/kg Rank2/
Davao del Norte 95.63 73
Occidental Mindoro 97.67 72
Davao del Sur 98.26 71
Zamboanga Sibugay 102.05 70
Camarines Sur 103.37 69
Sarangani 104.46 68
Zamboanga del Sur 110.73 67
Aklan 111.53 66
Compostela Valley 113.24 65
Albay 113.30 64

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 19. Ten Provinces
with the Most Expensive Bangus

Region/Province 2012
P/kg Rank2/
Siquijor 161.43 1
Camiguin 149.44 2
Nueva Ecija 146.39 3
Romblon 145.88 4
Ilocos Sur 145.64 5
Ifugao 145.04 6
Marinduque 143.80 7
Eastern Samar 143.51 8
Cavite 143.04 9
Southern Leyte 142.49 10

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 20. Ten Provinces
with the Cheapest Galunggong

Region/Province 2012
P/kg Rank2/
Sulu 48.41 74
Tawi-tawi 53.23 73
Palawan 68.25 72
Basilan 69.19 71
Samar (Western Samar) 72.90 70
Zamboanga Sibugay 74.98 69
Biliran 83.25 68
Marinduque 87.74 67
Occidental Mindoro 88.53 66
Davao del Sur 89.41 65

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 21. Ten Provinces
with the Most Expensive Galunggong

Region/Province 2012
P/kg Rank2/
Mountain Province 147.57 1
Rizal 142.75 2
Cavite 140.11 3
Bulacan 135.23 4
Nueva Ecija 133.48 5
Abra 126.92 6
Masbate 126.34 7
Southern Leyte 122.90 8
Batangas 122.60 9
Nueva Vizcaya 121.99 10

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 22. Ten Provinces
with the Cheapest Tilapia

Region/Province 2012
P/kg Rank2/
South Cotabato 49.76 61
Davao del Norte 61.62 60
North Cotabato 69.94 59
Sarangani 72.26 58
Sultan Kudarat 72.75 57
Bulacan 82.48 56
Compostela Valley 83.22 55
Misamis Oriental 84.56 54
Davao del Sur 84.63 53
Zamboanga del Sur 85.23 52

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics

 

Table 23. First semester retail prices of selected commodities and subsistence incidence by region

Region/Province Regular milled rice  Banana Latundan Beef meat with bones
2009 2012 2009 2012 2009 2012
P/kg Rank2/ P/kg Rank2/ P/kg Rank2/ P/kg Rank2/ P/kg Rank2/ P/kg Rank2/
Abra 32.1 16 32.5 28    2.7 11    2.9 10 196.6 5 206.0 9
Apayao 29.7 57 31.6 44    2.0 27    2.0 40 160.0 34 160.0 52
Benguet 29.5 61 30.0 61    2.4 18    3.9 3 200.0 2 200.0 11
Ifugao 32.8 9 33.0 22    1.6 42    2.2 36 173.3 22 180.0 27
Kalinga 30.7 41 31.7 41    1.0 72    1.2 67 174.1 21 180.0 27
Mountain Province 35.0 3 35.5 3    1.6 40    2.4 20 160.0 34 164.4 47
Ilocos Norte  *  *  *  *    3.2 4    2.5 15 140.0 59 140.4 68
Ilocos Sur 29.4 62 31.7 41    1.8 33    2.3 27 141.4 58 144.4 66
La Union 28.7 70 31.3 46    3.6 2    3.3 5 192.5 7 178.3 31
Pangasinan 29.8 56 30.0 59    2.6 12    2.2 37 171.9 24 189.3 20
Cagayan 29.6 59 30.0 60    1.3 53    1.9 47 180.0 18 186.6 23
Isabela 31.0 36 31.0 51    1.6 46    2.3 33 154.3 44 165.0 46
Nueva Vizcaya 30.6 42 29.0 71    1.2 66    2.7 14 169.5 25 170.0 41
Quirino 31.4 27 31.6 44    1.2 62    2.0 44  *  *  *  *
Aurora 30.4 44 30.8 56    1.2 64    2.3 31 136.5 62 154.9 59
Bataan  *  * 29.1 70    2.2 23    2.5 16 190.0 11 240.1 1
Bulacan 29.4 63 30.6 57    3.6 1    4.4 1 194.9 6 214.1 6
Nueva Ecija 31.1 31 32.2 32    3.2 3    4.0 2 192.2 9 239.0 2
Pampanga 30.0 51 33.4 18    1.8 36    2.4 24 190.4 10 177.2 33
Tarlac 29.4 64 29.0 71    2.8 8    3.3 6 186.0 15 186.3 24
Zambales 29.5 60 31.2 48    3.1 5    2.7 12 187.9 12 200.0 11
Batangas 28.8 69 30.0 61    2.2 24    3.2 7 192.2 8 204.4 10
Cavite 30.1 49 32.0 33    2.0 28    2.3 30 205.8 1 232.2 4
Laguna 29.1 66 30.0 61    2.4 16    3.5 4 168.0 27 180.3 26
Quezon 28.8 68 28.0 76    2.1 25    2.2 34 180.4 16 188.5 21
Rizal 29.9 53 30.8 53    2.6 13    2.3 29 186.1 14 236.0 3
Marinduque 30.8 37 31.8 40    1.8 37    1.5 57 186.9 13 190.0 18
Occidental Mindoro 28.0 73 29.0 71    1.9 32    1.7 51 172.6 23 192.0 17
Oriental Mindoro 29.9 55 29.0 71    1.3 58    2.0 42 197.7 4 212.6 7
Palawan 29.7 58 32.0 33    1.4 50    2.3 32 180.2 17 193.4 16
Romblon 31.6 22 29.2 68    1.8 34    1.4 61 140.0 59 145.0 65
Albay 30.1 46 30.0 61    2.9 6    2.9 9 180.0 19 198.7 14
Camarines Norte 28.2 72 28.6 75    1.6 41    3.0 8 150.0 49 175.5 36
Camarines Sur 28.6 71 29.5 67    1.7 39    1.9 46 168.3 26 185.5 25
Catanduanes 31.4 26 31.0 51    2.5 14    2.5 19  *  *  *  *
Masbate 31.8 19 30.8 55    1.9 31    1.8 50 155.4 42 180.0 27
Sorsogon 29.1 65 29.2 69    2.0 29    2.5 18 157.1 40 156.8 57
Aklan 29.0 67 30.0 66    2.8 9    2.4 25 149.1 53 126.0 72
Antique 29.9 54 31.2 50    2.0 26    1.5 56 145.6 56 156.0 58
Capiz 31.1 32 32.4 31    2.2 22    2.8 11 154.3 43 165.1 45
Guimaras 32.8 10 32.0 33    2.4 17    2.4 23 150.8 48 160.0 52
Iloilo 34.7 4 36.5 1    2.8 7    2.2 34 167.4 28 177.3 32
Negros Occidental 34.0 6 32.0 33    1.8 35    1.7 52 165.0 29 174.0 37
Bohol 30.7 40 32.0 33    2.5 15    2.7 13 158.1 38 160.0 52
Cebu 31.5 24 31.9 39    2.3 19    2.4 21 152.0 47 171.5 38
Negros Oriental 31.0 35 33.0 22    1.3 56    1.8 49 113.4 69 126.0 73
Siquijor 33.7 7 35.7 2    2.7 10    2.5 16 120.0 67 130.0 71
Biliran 33.1 8 33.3 20    1.3 59    1.6 54 154.1 45 189.5 19
Eastern Samar 32.1 17 33.6 15    1.2 60    2.3 26 200.0 2 200.0 11
Leyte 32.3 15 32.4 30    1.6 44    1.9 45 162.5 32 175.6 35
Northern Samar 31.3 28 31.3 47    2.3 20    2.0 43 164.3 31 196.0 15
Southern Leyte 32.8 11 33.5 17    1.5 47    1.4 58 150.0 49 180.0 27
Samar (Western Samar) 32.6 13 32.7 26    1.6 43    2.1 38  *  *  *  *
Zamboanga del Norte 35.5 1 35.1 5    1.3 57    1.3 62 106.8 71 145.9 64
Zamboanga del Sur 31.5 23 34.4 10    1.4 49    1.3 64 125.9 64 148.2 63
Zamboanga Sibugay  *  * 35.0 6    1.1 67    1.4 59  *  * 151.6 61
Bukidnon 32.1 18 32.9 24    1.1 69    1.2 69 139.1 61 168.3 42
Camiguin 35.0 2 35.5 4    0.8 76    1.1 71  *  * 161.2 51
Lanao del Norte 31.7 21 33.3 19    1.7 38    2.4 22 142.9 57 162.3 48
Misamis Occidental 32.7 12 32.8 25    1.1 68    1.1 72 130.0 63 152.0 60
Misamis Oriental 31.7 20 32.0 33    1.3 55    1.8 48 122.8 66 137.8 70
Davao del Norte 31.2 29 34.0 11    1.3 54    1.7 53 153.3 46 165.4 44
Davao del Sur 31.0 33 32.5 27    0.9 75    1.1 70 156.6 41 170.0 39
Davao Oriental 30.8 38 32.5 29    1.2 61    0.7 75 165.0 30 220.0 5
Compostela Valley 30.1 47 30.1 58    1.1 71    1.0 73 160.0 37 170.0 39
North Cotabato 30.1 48 33.2 21    1.0 73    0.6 76 115.0 68 140.0 69
Sarangani 30.6 43 33.6 14    1.2 63    2.3 28 147.0 55 165.5 43
South Cotabato 30.4 44 33.8 12  *  *  *  * 150.0 49 150.7 62
Sultan Kudarat 30.0 52  *  *    2.0 30    0.9 74 148.5 54 159.9 56
Agusan del Norte 31.0 34 31.6 43    1.5 48    1.4 60 149.4 52 176.7 34
Agusan del Sur 30.7 39 31.2 49    1.2 65    1.2 65 160.0 34 188.2 22
Surigao del Norte 32.3 14 34.4 9    1.6 45    2.0 40 180.0 19 208.8 8
Surigao del Sur 31.5 24 33.6 13    0.8 77    2.1 39  *  * 160.0 52
Basilan 31.2 29 34.6 8    1.1 70    1.3 63 161.0 33 161.5 50
Lanao del Sur 34.5 5 35.0 7    2.3 21  *  *  *  *  *  *
Maguindanao 30.0 50 33.5 16    1.4 51    1.2 68 125.1 65 143.0 67
Sulu 25.0 74 30.8 54    1.0 74    1.2 66 107.8 70 107.6 74
Tawi-tawi 25.0 74 30.0 61    1.4 52    1.5 55 157.4 39 161.9 49
Correlation coefficient 4/ 0.3441 0.3988 -0.2637 -0.4449 -0.3377 -0.2073
Level of significance  0.0027 0.0004 0.0213 0.0001 0.0043 0.0764
Correlation coefficient 5/ 0.3400 0.4364 -0.2648 -0.4312 -0.3176 -0.2132
Level of significance  0.0028 0.0001 0.0200 0.0001 0.0070 0.0681

 

Region/Province Pork meat with bones Chicken fully dressed Chicken eggs
2009 2012 2009 2012 2009 2012
P/kg Rank2/ P/kg Rank2/ P/kg Rank2/ P/kg Rank2/ P/piece Rank2/ P/piece Rank2/
Abra 174.4 2 178.0 4 131.3 19 140.0 13 4.1 76 4.8 51
Apayao 141.1 46 160.0 31 140.0 6 148.9 7 5.0 14 5.0 29
Benguet 170.6 4 183.9 1 141.5 4 156.0 1 4.7 40 4.9 36
Ifugao 170.0 5 143.3 59 140.7 5 133.7 23 4.8 29 4.5 62
Kalinga 150.0 34 150.0 49 140.0 6 141.0 11 4.9 22 4.5 63
Mountain Province 160.2 16 153.3 45 139.9 11 139.7 16 4.9 25 4.9 45
Ilocos Norte 169.1 7 168.9 19 136.2 15 139.1 18 4.7 42 4.8 47
Ilocos Sur 125.9 65 123.9 72 135.7 17 152.0 3 4.6 47 4.6 60
La Union 171.2 3 160.8 28 123.9 35 128.9 34 4.8 34 4.9 44
Pangasinan 145.6 40 159.9 34 122.2 39 128.7 35 4.9 19 4.5 64
Cagayan 168.1 9 152.7 46 130.5 22 127.9 39 4.7 38 4.6 58
Isabela 165.0 12 149.3 56 125.6 33 125.3 46 5.0 13 4.9 40
Nueva Vizcaya 160.1 17 150.0 49 126.5 29 128.0 37 4.5 55 4.4 70
Quirino 150.0 34 150.0 49 120.0 49 130.0 29 4.8 35 5.0 29
Aurora 130.2 57 156.0 41 140.0 6 145.5 8 4.8 27 4.8 50
Bataan 131.7 55 181.5 2 130.7 21 140.2 12 4.2 73 4.1 77
Bulacan 150.2 33 156.4 38 109.5 72 107.1 77 4.2 74 4.2 75
Nueva Ecija 150.5 32 172.5 9 120.7 46 122.4 52 4.6 48 4.6 59
Pampanga 129.0 60 139.5 63 129.8 23 127.5 40 4.5 62 4.6 61
Tarlac 153.3 28 165.5 21 121.1 43 121.9 56 4.4 66 5.0 28
Zambales 169.7 6 170.0 13 139.3 12 139.1 19 4.8 32 5.0 29
Batangas 165.7 11 168.1 20 132.6 18 141.3 10 4.3 70 4.4 67
Cavite 163.8 13 170.0 13 130.9 20 135.2 21 4.5 60 4.2 76
Laguna 167.3 10 169.5 18 128.7 25 127.5 41 4.4 65 4.4 69
Quezon 155.3 25 149.6 55 119.9 51 119.4 61 4.4 67 4.2 74
Rizal 139.8 50 159.8 35 126.0 32 132.1 25 4.4 68 4.4 73
Marinduque 174.5 1 174.3 7 145.2 2 152.6 2 4.7 36 4.9 43
Occidental Mindoro 145.0 41 160.0 31 161.1 1 150.0 4 4.9 20 4.8 46
Oriental Mindoro 169.1 8 161.7 27 126.3 30 139.5 17 4.9 23 4.9 41
Palawan 162.7 14 170.5 11 141.8 3 143.8 9 5.0 12 4.9 37
Romblon 102.0 74 110.0 74 136.4 14 150.0 4 4.9 21 5.0 29
Albay 160.0 18 160.8 29 128.6 26 122.8 50 4.8 30 4.9 42
Camarines Norte 160.0 18 165.5 22 120.3 47 122.2 53 4.5 59 4.4 72
Camarines Sur 143.6 43 135.2 68 114.7 69 116.4 70 4.4 69 4.5 65
Catanduanes 156.0 24 140.0 62 126.3 31 134.8 22 4.6 49 4.4 71
Masbate 152.4 29 170.0 13 140.0 6 149.7 6 5.4 5 4.9 37
Sorsogon 126.3 63 110.3 73 122.6 37 123.7 48 4.5 53 4.7 55
Aklan 127.4 61 100.2 75 125.4 34 117.0 68 5.0 14 5.6 9
Antique 156.4 23 155.9 42 128.0 27 120.7 57 4.6 46 4.7 54
Capiz 148.9 39 150.0 49 115.9 64 115.3 72 4.7 44 4.5 66
Guimaras 149.1 37 150.0 49 140.0 6 140.0 13 4.5 58 5.0 34
Iloilo 149.0 38 156.0 40 119.0 55 117.0 67 4.8 28 5.0 24
Negros Occidental 156.4 22 164.0 23 119.2 54 117.4 65 5.1 10 5.4 14
Bohol 151.2 31 170.0 13 * * 115.0 74 5.1 9 6.0 2
Cebu 154.4 27 173.3 8 118.9 56 116.5 69 4.3 71 4.8 48
Negros Oriental 155.1 26 175.6 6 122.9 36 114.5 75 4.9 24 5.7 8
Siquijor 116.3 68 130.0 69 120.2 48 132.2 24 5.5 3 5.3 16
Biliran 161.5 15 156.0 39 128.9 24 115.6 71 5.4 4 5.5 11
Eastern Samar 130.0 58 150.0 49 122.3 38 122.4 51 6.2 1 6.2 1
Leyte 143.8 42 153.3 44 116.8 63 119.1 62 5.2 7 5.2 21
Northern Samar 132.7 54 170.0 13 137.9 13 130.6 27 5.2 8 5.3 17
Southern Leyte 150.0 34 170.8 10 120.7 45 119.7 60 4.5 54 5.4 13
Samar (Western Samar) 103.1 73 130.0 69 112.0 71 117.7 64 4.7 41 4.9 39
Zamboanga del Norte 151.3 30 177.7 5 121.8 40 130.0 29 4.5 61 5.1 23
Zamboanga del Sur 123.4 66 150.5 47 117.8 60 118.6 63 4.7 43 5.3 18
Zamboanga Sibugay * * 150.2 48 * * 123.1 49 5.0 14 5.7 7
Bukidnon 138.2 51 138.6 64 118.6 58 120.6 58 4.8 31 4.8 49
Camiguin 131.3 56 160.0 31 * * 138.5 20 * * 5.2 19
Lanao del Norte 110.3 71 162.5 26 113.7 70 122.0 54 4.5 63 5.2 20
Misamis Occidental 130.0 58 163.4 24 114.9 68 125.1 47 4.7 37 5.3 15
Misamis Oriental 120.3 67 137.5 66 107.6 74 112.9 76 4.3 72 4.7 56
Davao del Norte 126.0 64 140.1 61 115.7 65 115.3 73 4.8 33 5.4 12
Davao del Sur 127.2 62 148.7 57 108.6 73 125.5 45 4.6 50 5.0 27
Davao Oriental 140.0 47 144.1 58 115.0 67 121.9 55 5.0 14 5.7 5
Compostela Valley 116.2 69 141.9 60 119.8 52 127.0 43 4.5 64 4.8 52
North Cotabato 106.7 72 130.0 69 120.8 44 131.9 26 4.5 57 5.0 25
Sarangani 142.0 45 162.9 25 117.7 61 120.0 59 4.1 75 4.7 57
South Cotabato 134.8 52 135.7 67 119.6 53 140.0 13 4.0 77 4.4 68
Sultan Kudarat 134.1 53 154.1 43 126.7 28 130.0 29 4.7 39 5.0 26
Agusan del Norte 142.9 44 160.1 30 118.2 59 117.2 66 4.6 45 4.8 53
Agusan del Sur 140.0 47 159.3 36 121.8 41 129.8 33 4.5 56 5.0 29
Surigao del Norte 160.0 18 170.4 12 120.0 49 126.4 44 4.6 51 5.1 22
Surigao del Sur 140.0 47 159.2 37 * * 130.1 28 4.5 52 5.0 35
Basilan 157.4 21 180.0 3 118.7 57 129.8 32 5.3 6 5.8 3
Lanao del Sur * * * * 121.6 42 * * 5.0 18 * *
Maguindanao 114.9 70 138.0 65 117.6 62 128.0 37 4.9 26 5.6 10
Sulu 95.1 75 95.0 76 136.1 16 127.4 42 5.9 2 5.8 4
Tawi-tawi * * * * 115.5 66 128.6 36 5.0 11 5.7 6
Correlation coefficient 4/ -0.1409 -0.0035 -0.0978 0.0062 0.2124 0.3517
Level of significance 0.2312 0.9759 0.4104 0.9575 0.0655 0.0017
Correlation coefficient 5/ -0.2093 -0.0578 -0.1834 -0.0036 0.2781 0.3223
Level of significance 0.0715 0.6198 0.1179 0.9754 0.0143 0.0043

 

Region/Province Bangus Galunggong
2009 2012 2009 2012
P/kg Rank2/ P/kg Rank2/ P/kg Rank2/ P/kg Rank2/
Abra 131.5 10 139.1 17 121.0 1 127.2 6
Apayao 125.3 22 126.7 30  *  *  *  *
Benguet 122.5 23 123.4 37 88.0 27 110.4 30
Ifugao 126.1 20 142.2 6 89.0 25 101.8 42
Kalinga 130.0 12 139.8 13 80.0 44 90.2 65
Mountain Province 120.8 30 138.1 19 108.9 5 148.0 1
Ilocos Norte 130.4 11 138.2 18 85.2 34 100.0 48
Ilocos Sur 127.3 18 143.7 5 93.4 20 113.4 24
La Union 121.0 29 123.3 38 87.2 28 101.0 44
Pangasinan 113.1 54 128.4 27 77.0 52 110.5 29
Cagayan 119.6 33 139.3 16 101.9 12 120.4 11
Isabela 134.8 5 141.5 9 90.3 23 119.9 13
Nueva Vizcaya 134.3 6 141.0 11 86.0 30 124.0 7
Quirino 126.4 19 135.7 22 83.2 39 119.2 15
Aurora 121.7 25 125.1 35 90.3 22 111.7 26
Bataan 118.9 35 119.2 57 89.1 24 117.5 17
Bulacan 114.7 52 127.2 29 116.7 3 136.3 3
Nueva Ecija 132.5 9 147.4 3 109.5 4 133.3 4
Pampanga 115.9 48 121.1 45 85.7 32 109.1 32
Tarlac 118.8 36 125.2 34 84.3 37 100.4 46
Zambales 100.8 69 122.2 42 95.4 16 119.7 14
Batangas 115.6 50 133.9 23 102.2 11 121.3 10
Cavite 121.7 24 141.1 10 119.0 2 132.1 5
Laguna 108.4 61 137.8 20 99.5 14 118.9 16
Quezon 110.7 59 118.7 58 81.4 42 106.7 36
Rizal 107.1 62 121.0 46 103.8 7 136.8 2
Marinduque 133.4 7 141.7 8 69.7 62 93.4 62
Occidental Mindoro 116.4 44 96.8 73 72.2 59 82.2 67
Oriental Mindoro 116.2 46 120.7 49 92.1 21 107.9 34
Palawan 118.5 38 122.5 40 50.4 73 65.3 72
Romblon 129.1 14 141.8 7 64.1 69 95.4 57
Albay 111.4 57 112.7 65 83.8 38 97.8 51
Camarines Norte 104.7 64 130.7 26 79.6 45 106.7 37
Camarines Sur 97.7 72 101.2 70 78.2 48 95.4 58
Catanduanes  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *
Masbate 115.9 49 120.1 52 94.0 17 123.1 9
Sorsogon 114.8 51 118.2 60 101.2 13 111.5 28
Aklan 121.3 26 109.9 67 102.2 10 112.1 25
Antique 148.5 1 139.6 15 85.7 31 96.6 54
Capiz 99.5 70 117.2 62 73.6 57 97.5 52
Guimaras 127.7 17 136.4 21 93.9 19 106.0 38
Iloilo 117.6 39 125.4 33 96.3 15 111.5 27
Negros Occidental 120.1 32 132.8 25 78.0 49 114.1 23
Bohol 115.9 47 120.1 53 85.5 33 104.1 41
Cebu 118.9 34 125.8 32 85.1 35 101.6 43
Negros Oriental 108.9 60 121.4 44 74.6 55 108.3 33
Siquijor 140.0 2 150.0 1 76.0 54 107.3 35
Biliran 132.9 8 127.2 28 68.9 64 76.6 68
Eastern Samar 121.3 27 140.2 12 93.9 18 110.2 31
Leyte 129.5 13 133.6 24 103.2 8 100.6 45
Northern Samar 112.6 55 121.0 47 74.5 56 96.4 56
Southern Leyte 138.4 4 144.9 4 107.3 6 123.7 8
Samar (Western Samar) 129.0 15 139.7 14 69.5 63 71.6 70
Zamboanga del Norte 103.5 66 122.5 41 58.8 70 91.8 63
Zamboanga del Sur 94.1 73 110.9 66 66.4 67 96.5 55
Zamboanga Sibugay 102.2 67 104.6 69 52.0 72 74.8 69
Bukidnon 120.6 31 119.6 56 86.0 29 93.9 61
Camiguin 139.9 3 149.4 2 79.4 46 114.6 22
Lanao del Norte 116.3 45 118.6 59 80.5 43 94.5 60
Misamis Occidental 105.4 63 124.4 36 71.8 60 87.8 66
Misamis Oriental 116.9 41 120.8 48 82.8 40 104.5 39
Davao del Norte 86.5 74 99.7 72 65.2 68 100.3 47
Davao del Sur 99.2 71 101.0 71 67.3 65 91.2 64
Davao Oriental 128.9 16 120.3 51 78.0 50 115.7 19
Compostela Valley 111.9 56 114.9 64 76.7 53 98.1 50
North Cotabato 110.8 58 120.0 54 102.4 9 120.3 12
Sarangani 101.0 68 106.7 68 70.2 61 97.3 53
South Cotabato 116.9 42 115.8 63 73.1 58 98.1 49
Sultan Kudarat 125.7 21 121.6 43 88.7 26 117.3 18
Agusan del Norte 104.4 65 117.9 61 79.2 47 104.4 40
Agusan del Sur 118.7 37 120.6 50 77.5 51 115.2 21
Surigao del Norte 114.4 53 122.9 39 82.4 41 115.6 20
Surigao del Sur 121.2 28 126.0 31 84.6 36 94.7 59
Basilan 78.0 75  *  * 40.8 74 69.4 71
Lanao del Sur 116.5 43  *  * 67.0 66  *  *
Maguindanao 117.1 40 119.7 55  *  *  *  *
Sulu  *  *  *  * 34.5 75 43.3 74
Tawi-tawi  *  *  *  * 56.0 71 52.2 73
Correlation coefficient 4/ -0.0749 -0.1560 -0.2117 -0.0830
Level of significance  0.5260 0.1876 0.0702 0.4820
Correlation coefficient 5/ -0.1046 -0.2195 -0.2824 -0.1727
Level of significance  0.3720 0.0620 0.0141 0.1412

 

Region/Province Tilapia Subsistence incidence 1/
2009 2012 2009 2012
P/kg Rank2/ P/kg Rank2/ Estimate Rank3/ Estimate Rank3/
Abra 100.1 14 120.0 5 32.4 10 27.9 16
Apayao 100.3 13 120.0 5 36.6 3 45.3 2
Benguet 91.7 25 95.0 40 3.2 71 1.4 77
Ifugao 101.2 12 108.6 19 21.3 28 32.9 8
Kalinga 90.0 27 112.1 15 19.6 31 20.3 27
Mountain Province 113.8 4 116.8 12 30.4 11 20.0 28
Ilocos Norte 97.9 18 102.1 26 4.4 69 4.6 71
Ilocos Sur 96.3 19 102.9 24 4.6 67 11.4 56
La Union 85.4 39 88.9 47 11.5 57 9.1 62
Pangasinan 80.5 46 86.2 50 9.3 60 8.6 65
Cagayan 87.7 31 107.9 21 9.2 61 9.1 63
Isabela 90.1 26 99.8 30 12.6 53 8.8 64
Nueva Vizcaya 95.6 21 117.1 11 4.6 68 16.4 41
Quirino 86.9 33 102.9 25 3.6 70 6.1 69
Aurora 99.5 16 100.2 28 14.3 50 13.6 47
Bataan 88.6 29 94.3 41 1.0 76 2.2 75
Bulacan 73.9 52 81.5 55 2.3 73 1.5 76
Nueva Ecija 87.4 32 93.0 43 14.3 51 12.6 49
Pampanga 78.9 49 86.2 49 1.8 75 2.5 74
Tarlac 83.3 43 86.2 48 6.7 64 5.7 70
Zambales 79.8 47 83.0 52 8.6 63 10.1 60
Batangas 86.3 35 91.3 45 6.7 65 11.4 55
Cavite 99.4 17 109.5 18 0.3 77 1.0 78
Laguna 93.1 23 111.3 16 2.4 72 3.7 72
Quezon 85.6 37 90.2 46 10.5 58 9.7 61
Rizal 86.3 36 95.6 37 4.6 66 3.0 73
Marinduque 109.7 7 117.5 10 12.3 55 12.6 48
Occidental Mindoro 125.3 2 129.1 4 15.9 43 28.2 14
Oriental Mindoro 91.7 24 100.1 29 16.2 42 18.1 36
Palawan  *  *  *  * 17.6 35 16.1 43
Romblon 106.9 8 129.6 3 22.6 26 14.9 44
Albay 84.6 41 95.6 38 22.3 27 21.8 25
Camarines Norte 93.3 22 99.2 32 14.9 47 10.3 58
Camarines Sur 74.7 51 97.5 35 24.2 20 18.0 37
Catanduanes  *  *  *  * 12.3 54 25.7 18
Masbate 102.5 11 109.8 17 34.5 4 28.0 15
Sorsogon 100.1 15 102.9 23 16.8 39 16.4 40
Aklan 86.6 34 103.9 22 25.6 18 7.2 68
Antique 128.9 1 130.3 2 18.6 33 14.3 46
Capiz 87.8 30 95.4 39 14.8 49 12.5 51
Guimaras 106.7 9 116.0 13 - 78 16.3 42
Iloilo 103.2 10 119.6 8 11.9 56 11.7 54
Negros Occidental 111.2 6 134.0 1 16.2 41 14.7 45
Bohol 121.7 3 120.0 5 24.1 21 19.7 31
Cebu  *  *  *  * 15.3 46 12.3 53
Negros Oriental 112.2 5 113.1 14 27.6 14 34.1 7
Siquijor  *  *  *  * 14.9 48 12.6 50
Biliran  *  *  *  * 20.8 29 7.9 67
Eastern Samar  *  *  *  * 33.4 6 42.4 3
Leyte  *  *  *  * 16.9 38 19.5 33
Northern Samar 84.1 42 108.1 20 33.2 7 25.9 17
Southern Leyte  *  *  *  * 15.5 44 24.4 20
Samar (Western Samar)  *  *  *  * 23.8 22 19.8 30
Zamboanga del Norte 85.6 38 118.0 9 53.4 1 38.1 4
Zamboanga del Sur 70.7 54 82.1 54 17.4 36 19.6 32
Zamboanga Sibugay 79.6 48 99.3 31 23.1 25 22.9 22
Bukidnon  *  * 96.2 36 26.3 17 29.9 13
Camiguin  *  *  *  * 2.2 74 25.6 19
Lanao del Norte 89.0 28 97.6 34 28.5 13 34.3 6
Misamis Occidental 67.0 55 93.5 42 26.7 16 22.3 24
Misamis Oriental 72.9 53 82.3 53 20.2 30 17.7 38
Davao del Norte 43.4 61 59.7 60 17.7 34 18.5 34
Davao del Sur 81.3 45 85.8 51 12.8 52 12.5 52
Davao Oriental 75.7 50 100.9 27 33.7 5 32.0 10
Compostela Valley 65.6 57 81.4 56 17.3 37 18.2 35
North Cotabato 65.9 56 72.1 57 15.3 45 36.9 5
Sarangani 58.3 58 68.2 58 27.1 15 32.4 9
South Cotabato 52.3 60 50.1 61 16.5 40 19.9 29
Sultan Kudarat 55.5 59 62.1 59 25.1 19 23.0 21
Agusan del Norte  *  *  *  * 23.5 24 22.7 23
Agusan del Sur 82.7 44 98.5 33 39.3 2 30.6 11
Surigao del Norte  *  *  *  * 32.8 9 21.4 26
Surigao del Sur  *  *  *  * 28.7 12 17.0 39
Basilan  *  *  *  * 9.6 59 11.1 57
Lanao del Sur 84.7 40  *  * 33.2 8 50.2 1
Maguindanao 96.1 20 92.5 44 19.5 32 30.3 12
Sulu  *  *  *  * 8.8 62 8.6 66
Tawi-tawi  *  *  *  * 23.8 23 10.2 59
Correlation coefficient 4/ -0.0042 0.0816
Level of significance  0.9745 0.5319
Correlation coefficient 5/ -0.0547 0.1368
Level of significance  0.6755 0.2933

Source: Bureau of Agricultural Statistics
* - Data not available
Notes:
1/- Subsistence incidence refers to the proportion of individuals with per capita income less than the per capita food threshold to the total number of individuals
2/ - Rank out of the provinces (1=highest retail price)
3/ - Rank out of the provinces (1=highest subsistence incidence)
4/ - Correlation coefficient between 2009 retail price and subsistence incidence in 2009 (*=significant at 0.05; **=at 0.01)
5/ - Correlation coefficient between ranks of 2009 retail price and subsistence incidence in 2009 (*=significant at 0.05; **=at 0.01)
*- piece per peso

 

Table 24. Percentage of Households
who Purchase NFA Rice

2006 2009
General Population 12.48 28.45
Poor 25.37 47.2
Non-Poor 8.98 23.5

Source of Basic data: FIES, National Statistics Office

 

Table 25. Average Family Expenditures
on NFA Rice by those who purchase NFA rice

2006 2009
General Population 4,626 5,836
Poor 5,464 6,985
Non-Poor 3,984 5,227

Source of Basic data: FIES, National Statistics Office

 

Table 26. Quarterly Indices on Compensation per Employee
at Current Prices (1978=100)

Items 2010 2011 2012
Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4
Compensation per Index 2,037 2,076 2,310 2,310 2,065 2,181 2,391 2,419 2,183 2,310 2,509 2,613
Growth rates              1.4      5.1      3.5      4.7      5.7      5.9      4.9      8.0

Source: National Statistical Coordination Board

 


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Posted: 12 July 2013

 


 

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